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markdown jeej

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Joshua Moerman (@Kassalade) 11 years ago
parent
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093e50fa3f
  1. 7
      README.md
  2. 3
      binary_output/README.md
  3. 14
      brainfuck/README.md
  4. 22
      iterators/README
  5. 27
      iterators/README.md

7
README → README.md

@ -1,5 +1,10 @@
it works
========
(at least i hope so...)
Here are some (hopefully useful) c++ snippets/libs/helperthingies.
Probably all are header only, with a main.cpp for testing.
Stuff probably needs some C++0x features.
Stuff probably needs some *C++0x* features.

3
binary_output/README → binary_output/README.md

@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
Usage:
======
std::cout << make_binary(1337) << make_binary("a c-style array");
std::cout << make_binary(1337) << make_binary("a c-style array");
will output binary representations of shizzle.
Make sure your type is copyable by just copying it's memory-region.

14
brainfuck/README → brainfuck/README.md

@ -1,23 +1,25 @@
Usage:
======
```C++
brainfuck("++++++++++[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>++.>+.+++++++..+++.>++.<<+++++++++++++++.>.+++.------.--------.>+.>.");
The default arguments make it use std::cout and an empty string as input.
```
The default arguments make it use `std::cout` and an empty string as input.
You can also use a string as input:
brainfuck(",[.,]", "input");
brainfuck(",[.,]", "input");
Or with a stream/container/iterator:
brainfuck(",[.,]", std::input_iterator<char>(std::cin));
brainfuck(",[.,]", std::input_iterator<char>(std::cin));
You can specify the memory-units:
brainfuck<int>("...");
brainfuck<int>("...");
As long as the type has certain operators. The default output is comma-seperated, except for char.
You can specify an output-iterator:
brainfuck("...", "", std::back_inserter(my_vector));
brainfuck("...", "", std::back_inserter(my_vector));
It has a lot of defaultparameters, because it's intended use was on an irc-channel.

22
iterators/README

@ -1,22 +0,0 @@
counted
=======
"for(auto x : counted(v)) { ... x.value ... x.index ... }"
x.value is a reference to the element in the container (so you can change it's value), x.index is what it is.
Container should have forward iterators.
This headers is purely a handy tool for the range-based-for-loops (ie "for(auto x : counter(v))"). Using it explicitly with iterators is not recommended!
There is no const version of it. Doing "for(const auto x : counted(v))" doesn't make it impossible to change x (so the element in the container can be modified).
Example:
for(auto x : counted(v)) {
std::cout << "v[" << x.index << "] = " << x.value << std::endl;
x.value *= 2;
}
This will output the container v, with it's indeces. And it will multiply every value in v by 2.

27
iterators/README.md

@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
counted
=======
```C++
for(auto x : counted(v)) {
... x.value ... x.index ...
}
```
`x.value` is a reference to the element in the container (so you can change it's value), `x.index` is what it is.
Container should have forward iterators.
This headers is purely a handy tool for the range-based-for-loops (ie `for(auto x : counter(v))`). Using it explicitly with iterators is not recommended!
There is no const version of it. Doing `for(const auto x : counted(v))` doesn't make it impossible to change `x` (so the element in the container can be modified).
Example:
```C++
for(auto x : counted(v)) {
std::cout << "v[" << x.index << "] = " << x.value << std::endl;
x.value *= 2;
}
```
This will output the container `v`, with it's indeces. And it will multiply every value in `v` by 2.